I love mornings. Each new day brings new opportunities and it’s a chance to start fresh and do better. How you start your day, or more specifically how you spend those first few morning hours has a big impact on the rest of it. Think of it as setting the tone for your entire day. That’s why making over your morning is so important. It’s about how to have impact from a morning routine, which will be much more valuable to you  than those first few hours without a strong routine.

I’m sure you’ve experienced this yourself. Let’s use the snooze button as an example. You set an early alarm to make sure you have time for exercise, meditation, or simply some much needed “me time”. You have every intention of getting up and doing whatever you’re setting out to do when you set the alarm in the first place. Some mornings – hopefully most mornings – you get up when the alarm chimes and go for that walk, do your meditation exercise, or read a book for twenty minutes. Then there are those days when you just can’t make yourself get up. You hit the snooze button multiple times, or turn the alarm off altogether and go back to sleep.

Think about how the rest of those days went. Did you notice a difference in how you felt? How much did you get done on the mornings when you got up with your first alarm? Were you able to do all the things you set out to do? How did those days compare to the ones when you hit the snooze button over and over again? And if I were to offer you the secret perhaps it would shock you, but never the less, the secret would simply be how to have impact from a morning routine. Think about it, you’re probably already in a morning routine without to realize it, and/or that routine having the positive effect it can and should have on your day. That being said,

If I had to take a guess, I’d say that the mornings when you got up as soon as the alarm went off went a lot smoother. I bet you accomplished what you have planned to do, too. Chances are that sleeping through the snooze button didn’t just affect your morning, but the entire rest of your day. You set the tone for how your day is going to go first thing in the morning. That’s what the old saying about getting up on the wrong side of the bed is about. Let’s make sure we get up on the right side and start our day off in a positive and productive way.

Over the course of the next seven days, I want to guide you through the process of making over your morning. As we’ve already established, this is an important tasks and a good thing to work on and pay attention to. Not only will you enjoy your mornings more even if the alarm goes off much earlier than you’d like, it will make the entire rest of your day go much smoother.

For a free series of reports that show you The Impact from a Morning Routine, grab a copy of Rone de Beauvoir’s “Your Best Day Starts with a Morning Routine.” It will save you plenty of headache, time, money and allow you more time to complete the task you procrastinate about, and provide more momentum in your day.

This article is apart of a Morning Series. If you would like to review each article, please sign-up below for your FREE downloadable copies every day.

Enjoy!

Rone de Beauvoir

 

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A huge proportion of the modern world relies almost fully on caffeine just to function. Millions of office workers start their day with a cup of coffee and without it they claim they would never be able to get any work done.

But when you work for yourself, it’s no longer enough to just do what everyone else does, or to do what feels efficient. Instead, you should focus on looking at the hard data to see which trends and habits result in the best output.

When you do that, how does caffeine really hold up?

How Caffeine Works

First, it would be helpful to look at how caffeine actually works. Specifically then, caffeine works by blocking the brain’s adenosine receptors. Adenosine is a neurotransmitter that makes us feel sleepy and when the brain blocks the receptors, this prevents it from taking action on our brain. As a result, we don’t feel as worn out and our brain feels more alert and aware. What’s interesting, is that the response to this is for our brains to produce even more neurochemicals to help us feel even more alert. Thus we release dopamine and adrenaline and become increasingly more switched on and focused.

The Effects of Caffeine

In the short term, caffeine positively impacts on focus and on memory and helps to make us more productive as a result. Unfortunately though, it also has a number of unwanted side effects. For starters, it causes the brain to produce more adenosine receptors over time. The more caffeine we consume, the more receptors we grow and the more caffeine we need to get the same buzz.

Eventually, we become so sensitive to adenosine that we need caffeine just to feel ‘normal’. In fact, it has been suggested that often when we wake up with sleep inertia, we are in fact not overly tired but instead feeling the effects of caffeine withdrawal from not having had any coffee during our sleep!

Caffeine also negatively affects our sleep, it creates something of a ‘crash’ when it wears off and the adenosine build up comes flooding in and it can hamper our creativity (because focus is actually antithetical to creativity in many ways).

So what’s the solution? To stop drinking caffeine?

Actually no – not if it is working for you. However, what you do need to consider is cutting back and you should make sure you never find yourself in a position where it becomes a crutch.

A huge proportion of the modern world relies almost fully on caffeine just to function. Millions of office workers start their day with a cup of coffee and without it they claim they would never be able to get any work done.

But when you work for yourself, it’s no longer enough to just do what everyone else does, or to do what feels efficient. Instead, you should focus on looking at the hard data to see which trends and habits result in the best output.

When you do that, how does caffeine really hold up?

First, it would be helpful to look at how caffeine actually works. Specifically then, caffeine works by blocking the brain’s adenosine receptors. Adenosine is a neurotransmitter that makes us feel sleepy and when the brain blocks the receptors, this prevents it from taking action on our brain. As a result, we don’t feel as worn out and our brain feels more alert and aware. What’s interesting, is that the response to this is for our brains to produce even more neurochemicals to help us feel even more alert. Thus we release dopamine and adrenaline and become increasingly more switched on and focused.

So what’s the solution? To stop drinking caffeine?

Enjoy Your Day!

Rone de Beauvoir